Kikuyu, Kalenjin dominate parastatal CEO jobs

Economy

Kikuyu, Kalenjin dominate parastatal CEO jobs

Public Service Cabinet Secretary Margaret Kobia. FILE PHOTO | NMG 

Kikuyu and Kalenjin communities dominate top jobs in government, embassies and chief executive positions in parastatals, a new report on the ethnic composition in State shows.

The Public Service Commission (PSC) says in a new report to Parliament that Kikuyus and Kalenjins account for 29 percent and 11 percent of the 417 top jobs in government, including directors and principal secretaries respectively.

Kikuyus accounted for 27 percent of Kenya’s 66 ambassadors with Kalenjins taking 14 percent amid the push to ensure that offices funded by taxpayers have a face of Kenya with all communities given an opportunity to serve.

On CEOs of parastatals, Kikuyus took 20 per cent of the positions followed by Kalenjins at 19.4 per cent, Luo (14.4 per cent) and Luhya (10 per cent).

of Kenya with all communities given an opportunity to serve.

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On CEOs of parastatals, Kikuyus took 20 per cent of the positions followed by Kalenjins at 19.4 per cent, Luo (14.4 per cent) and Luhya (10 per cent).

The Constitution introduced the ethnic representation requirements to check a historical trend where the tribesmen of those in power were favoured during recruitment.

“Ethnic representation in the service is examined against the corresponding national population proportion,” Margaret Kobia, the Cabinet Secretary said in a report on ethnic composition on top level management in Ministries, State Corporations and Embassies.

According to PSC diversity policy, all public service institutions will now be required to prepare measures to correct the ethnic imbalance.

Prof Kobia said 210 public institutions have developed a three-year plan to address the imbalances in terms of ethnic, gender and persons with disabilities. “All public agencies have developed the above mentioned plans to address the gaps by progressively working towards achieving near-parity,” she said.

Under the diversity policy for State Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) released in December 2015 by PSC, ethnic groups whose job representation surpasses their corresponding national population proportion are considered to be over-represented.

The diversity policy was expected to tackle the problem of over-representation by setting hiring quotas for ethnic groups and disadvantaged classes such as the disabled.

The PSC data indicate central Kikuyu are over-presented among the top officers in government with 120 positions that accounted for 29 per cent of the senior jobs against their 17 per cent share of population based on 2019 Census. They accounted 20 per cent of parastatal CEO jobs and 27 per cent of top positions in foreign missions.

The Kalenjins share of the population stood at 13 per cent, but controlled 19.4 per cent of CEOs in State-owned firms and 14 per cent of top Embassy jobs. They have 11 per cent of senior jobs in the civil service.

Luos account for 11 per cent of Kenya’s population but control 14.4 per cent CEOs positions in parastatals and 10 per cent of top government jobs.

Merus account for four per cent of Kenya’s population, but are overrepresented among the top jobs in government and chief executive positions in parastatals.

The Luhyas, which form 14 per cent of the Kenyan population accounted for eight per cent of senior positions in the civil service and 10 per cent of top jobs in the foreign missions.

Other underrepresented communities include the Mijikenda, Kisii, Njemps, Kenyan Arabs, Kenyan Asians and Ogiek.

The Kikuyu and Kalenjin dominance mirrors the two tribes’ presence at the highest office in Kenya since Independence.

President Uhuru Kenyatta succeeded Mwai Kibaki, both Kikuyus. President Daniel arap Moi who ruled for 24 years before Mr Kibaki was a Kalenjin. Deputy President William Ruto is also a Kalenjin.

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